Administering antibiotics to kids below 2 years linked to high risks of obesity

Administering antibiotics to kids below 2 years linked to high risks of obesity

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A study conducted by the researcher, Frank Irving Scott, has revealed that giving about three or more courses of antibiotic medications to children below 2 years of age can increase their chances of becoming obese during early childhood.

Over the years, antibiotics have been widely used to initiate weight gain in livestock, and this study has proved that this form of medicine has the same effect on humans as well.

Scott mentions that this in no way means that antibiotics should not be administered to children as and when necessary, although he says both doctors and parents should think before giving antibiotics to toddlers and should only choose them as the last option.

Scott performed a large study in the UK to come to this conclusion and analyzed the link between antibiotics and obesity in children aged between 2 to 4 years.

The findings show that being on antibiotics can increase the risk of early childhood obesity by 1.2% absolute and 25% on relative terms. This risk is highly increased due to repeated courses of antibiotics, on an average of 3 or more such courses during infancy.

This study was published online on the site Gastroenterology.