IVF & Menopause – Know How Helpful Can It Be!

IVF & Menopause – Know How Helpful Can It Be!

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By Dr. Varun H ShahIVF Speciality

With the advent of IVF technology, it has become possible for even menopausal and postmenopausal women to get pregnant and reproduce. Following 4 things that you must know about IVF treatment after menopause:

  1. After menopause the uterus starts getting atrophied because the ovaries no longer release eggs and the sex hormones oestrogen and progesterone. Now that eggs are not released every month and menstruation stops, the general notion is that the person will not be able to get pregnant. But with IVF technology the uterus can be prepared for receiving the embryo. Uterus is rejuvenated with the help of hormonal stimulation. So prior to an IVF cycle, an extensive oestrogen and progesterone therapy must be performed to achieve a successful pregnancy.
  2. Since there is no release of eggs after menopause, pregnancy is induced with the help of frozen donor eggs. Donor eggs are very healthy, devoid of any diseases – both infectious and genetic. Information about every donor is very extensively detailed by the donor egg banks. So, after menopause, if a couple decides to have baby with a donor egg, it becomes advantageous for them. They can choose the donor eggs based on the features outlined by the donor. If the woman uses her own postmenopausal or menopausal eggs, there are risks of chromosomal defects like Down syndrome or miscarriage.
  3. When the uterus is prepared well for receiving the embryo, the womb’s functionality improves. But before starting the IVF treatment, the woman must attain a healthy body so that it risk of complications is drastically reduced.
  4. It is as risky to bear a child in the twenties or thirties as it is after menopause. So, if the woman has a healthy body, it becomes easier for her to deliver a healthy baby with the least amount of complications. Although, one distinct disadvantage of using own eggs after menopause to get pregnant is that it can result in the child having chromosomal abnormalities. But if the person uses donor eggs or uses her own preserved eggs, then such complications do not occur.